Question: What Causes Congenital Heart Defects In Babies?

What is the most common congenital heart defect in infants?

The most common congenital heart defect is a bicuspid aortic valve (BAV).

The aortic valve opens and shuts to allow blood flow from the heart to the aorta..

Is congenital heart defect a disability?

If your child has a congenital heart defect, he or she may be eligible for Social Security disability benefits. The Social Security Administration (SSA) offers monthly financial aid for people of all ages who have serious conditions or illnesses.

Can congenital heart defects be cured?

There is no cure for CHD. Many people have surgeries to repair their heart, however, they are not cured. There may be long-term effects of heart surgery, such as abnormal heartbeats. A cardiologist can often detect problems with your heart before you notice any symptoms.

Can stress cause congenital heart defects?

MONDAY, March 25 (HealthDay News) — Stress in mothers before and during pregnancy may boost the risk of congenital heart defects in their children, more new evidence suggests.

What is the most common cause of congenital heart disease?

Genetic conditions Down’s syndrome is the most widely-known genetic condition that can cause congenital heart disease. Children with Down’s syndrome are born with a range of disabilities as the result of a genetic abnormality.

What is the life expectancy for a child with congenital heart defect?

Survival. About 97% of babies born with a non-critical CHD are expected to survive to one year of age. About 95% of babies born with a non-critical CHD are expected to survive to 18 years of age.

How do you know if your baby has congenital heart disease?

Signs and symptoms swelling of the legs, tummy or around the eyes. extreme tiredness and fatigue. a blue tinge to the skin (cyanosis) tiredness and rapid breathing when a baby is feeding.

How can you tell if your baby has a heart problem?

Signs and symptoms could include:Pale gray or blue skin color (cyanosis)Rapid breathing.Swelling in the legs, abdomen or areas around the eyes.Shortness of breath during feedings, leading to poor weight gain.

How common are congenital heart defects?

What are congenital heart defects? Congenital heart defects are the most common type of birth defect in the United States, affecting nearly 1% (about 40,000) of births per year. CHDs are present at birth and they affect the structure of a baby’s heart and the way it works.

How long do CHD patients live?

We estimate that the average life expectancy of these adult patients will be 35 to 40 years for those with complex CHD, and 55 years for those with moderate CHD. Thus, patients with complex CHD believed they would live about 35 years longer than expected, and those with moderate CHD about 20 years longer than expected.

How does congenital heart defect affect a child?

Severe heart disorders generally become evident during the first few months after birth. Some babies are blue or have very low blood pressure shortly after birth. Other defects cause breathing difficulties, feeding problems or poor weight gain. Minor defects are most often diagnosed during a routine medical checkup.

How can I prevent my baby from having a heart defect?

Avoid drinking alcohol or taking medication. Take 400 micrograms of folic acid supplement a day during the first trimester (first 12 weeks) of your pregnancy – this lowers your risk of giving birth to a child with congenital heart disease, as well as several other types of birth defect.

How common are heart defects in babies?

Nearly 1 in 100 babies (about 1 percent or 40,000 babies) is born with a heart defect in the United States each year. About 1 in 4 babies born with a heart defect (about 25 percent) has a critical CHD. Some heart defects don’t need treatment or can be treated easily.

Can a baby survive heart defects?

For infants with critical congenital heart defects (CCHDs), survival up to one year of life has improved over time. However, the chance of these infants dying is still high.

Can you live a normal life with congenital heart disease?

As medical care and treatment have improved, babies and children with congenital heart defects (CHDs) are living longer and healthier lives. Most are now living into adulthood. Ongoing, appropriate medical care can help children and adults with a CHD live as healthy as possible.